Free Shipping Over $25

Why Use A Badger Shave Brush When Shaving

May 19, 2017

Why Use A Badger Shave Brush When Shaving

Father Knows Best

The shave brush is a classic implement, partly responsible for your granddaddy's marble-smooth skin. Its usage stretches back hundreds of years, with modern versions first appearing in France during the late 18th century.

Used to apply shave soap lather or cream to the face, shave brushes are central to the centuries-old ritual of wet shaving. Why the badger shave brush? To fully appreciate the badger shaving brush, first, a primer on wet shaving.

Gentleman Prefer Badger Brushes

There are several preliminary steps that seasoned razor-wielders follow to the letter for optimal results.

Step 1: Apply a pre-shave oil and conditioner to soften your facial hair, enhance blade glide and reduce the possibility of burn, redness and flare-ups.
Step 2: Apply a shave cream or soap to your face using a shave brush to lubricate the skin, reduce blade-to-skin/hair friction and to desensitize the skin.

You have the option of using a shave brush to apply shave cream directly to your skin. Or you can go old school and use your brush to develop a shave soap lather in a shave bowl. Either technique yields superior results when completed with a badger brush. Why?

Badger hair is naturally very fibrous, so it possesses the ideal softness/prickliness and resilience. Badger brush bristles effectively lift and soften your facial hair, whereas using your hand tends to lift hairs unevenly or mat them down.

With softened hair lifted and suspended in a creamy matrix, your razor glides over your face without skipping and cuts your hair without your having to press your razor to your skin. Result? Baby clean skin, less nicks, irritation, redness and ingrowns.

Badger Hair Puts The "Wet" in Wet Shaving

Badger hair's high fibrousness makes it extremely absorbent. Bristles that hold more water produce creamier, more emollient shave soap lather using the old school "swirl" method in the bowl. Better still, you can tailor the sheer pleasure of applying soap lather to your face by narrowing down your choices of badger brush.

Pure badger consists of common badger hair, which covers roughly 60 percent of its body. 'Pure' hair has a large shaft and is fairly more coarse than other types of badger hair. Pure hair brushes often come trimmed to shape, which further stiffens and roughens their ends. Great for coarse beards.

Best badger hairs are fine and pliable, found on about 20 to 25 percent of the badger's body. 'Best' badger hair brushes tend to be dense, producing succulent, thick lather. They are also seldom cut to shape, which preserves softness. Suitable for all types of beard hair and skin types.

Super badger hairs are more expensive than 'pure' and 'best.' 'Super' badger hair brushes are actually high-grade 'pure' hairs bleached to resemble the next grade up, silvertip. Even so, 'super' badger hair is graded and sorted to high standards, resulting in a brush whose texture is superior to that of 'best' badger hair. Ideal for both amateur and seasoned razor-wielders.

Silvertip badger hairs are finer and the most expensive, with tips that naturally appear white. The 'silvertip' bristle load is often flared, so it has exceptional water retention. This helps you to create magnificent, viscous lather in record time. 'Silvertip' brushes are perfect for sensitive skin.

Explore the options available to you on your quest for the perfectly shaved face. The best proof is experience, so consider purchasing a badger shaving brush today.